unusual Dental Issues & cases

 

PARROT MOUTH

STEP MOUTH / PROTUBERANT MOLARS

FRACTURED INCISOR

BLIND/UNERUPTED

   WOLF TOOTH

            MISSING INCISORS

    (TRAUMA)              (INHERITED)

          EXTRA INCISORS

  (“SUPERNUMERARY” TEETH)

UNEVEN

INCISORS

OFFSET INCISORS

      (TRAUMA)

IRREGULAR WEAR

   (STALL RAKER)

IRREGULAR WEAR

(GERIATRIC)

UNDERSHOT JAW

  “SOW MOUTH”

SEVERE ORAL ULCERATION

LOWER WOLF TOOTH

“SHARK TEETH”

(double row of incisors)

FRACTURED MANDIBLE

IRREGULAR WEAR   

       (CRIBBER)

FRACTURED PREMOLAR

WAVE MOUTH

DOUBLE INFUNDIBULA

Unusual Dental Conditions



SEVERE ROSTRAL PREMOLAR HOOKS

WRY NOSE

SHEAR MOUTH

INTERESTING DENTAL CASES

“TRIUMPH” -  9 year old Caspian gelding

The Case - Mysteriously Missing Teeth

Pertinent History -

Upon routine annual dental examination, Triumph presented with significantly protuberant 1/08 and 2/08 upper premolars (12-20 mm overlong), and large caudal hooks on both upper 11’s. It was noted that the upper 08’s were unopposed, as the lower 08’s were missing entirely.  The tissue below the protuberant teeth was flat and even with the gum line.  It was also very smooth with no evidence of tooth remnants, sockets or depressions in the gum.


Records from his 3-4 year old examination showed normal shedding of upper and lower 06, 07,and 08 caps.  Records from his 5-6 year old examination showed normal eruption of permanent lower 08’s.  It is known that the lower premolars were not previously surgically removed.


Discussion -

Although Triumph’s caps were shed normally at the appropriate age,  the adult teeth which came into occlusion after them must have been compromised or malformed, which  led to their premature expiration and subsequent absence.






*** For those of you who have never heard of the Caspian Horse breed, please check out the following website:  www.dimarcaspians.com I think you will be impressed!

“ECLIPSE” - 12 year old Arabian mare

The Case - Stick Stuck in Mouth

Pertinent History -

Eclipse presented with a 6 month history of intermittent, mild colic. Previous work ups by the farm  veterinarian and equine referral hospitals revealed no significant abnormalities in her mouth, her GI tract anatomy or her blood work. 


Upon oral examination with a full mouth speculum and light, Eclipse’s teeth were found to be in good shape, but a piece of debris was noted on her hard palate.  At first glance, it looked like a piece of a dry, brown leaf, but further investigation demonstrated that it was, in fact, a piece of wood.  The wood appeared to have been an old piece of fence board, or garden mulch.  It was  implanted in the tissues of the hard palate in such a way that every time Eclipse moved her tongue, the wood was pushed in further caudally toward her throat.  The wood sliver was removed intact in 3 pieces with a dental forceps.  A small depression/ tissue defect was noted in the hard palate after removal of the wood, but it did not appear to communicate with any deeper structures of the mouth, like arteries, nerves, or the sinuses.  The intact piece of wood was approximately 4 cm long .  The surface of the wood which had been embedded in the hard palate was rough and convex, while the side against her tongue was very flat,smooth and shiny. It actually looked like it had been varnished ! After the foreign body removal, Eclipse experienced no further colic episodes.


Discussion -

The discomfort Eclipse was experiencing from the wood sliver embedded in her hard palate was most likely the cause of her intermittent colic episodes.  Every time she moved her tongue, it pushed the piece of wood further up into her palate causing her pain, and most likely prevented her from eating normally.  It should be noted that a horse can exhibit signs of “colic” for reasons other than digestive system upset.


Take home message for this case - ALWAYS visually examine the entire mouth with a light!


THE SABERTOOTH HORSE

DOLLY -  THE PARROT MOUTH HORSE

COMING SOON - PLEASE STAY TUNED!

RANCH HORSE - CHRONIC REARING UNDER SADDLE

PERIODONTAL DISEASE

TUMORS

ABSCESS UNDER TONGUE

TOOTH ROOT ABSCESS

EAR TOOTH


DENTIGEROUS  CYST

TISSUE DAMAGE

“FANGS” found in 20 + year old Quarter Horse Gelding

The Case - “You miss more by not looking than by not knowing”  ~ author unknown


Pertinent History -

Aged gelding recently purchased - dropping  most of his feed and quite on the thin side. (BCS - 4/9) Seller stated that horse had recently been floated. Upon examination with a full mouth speculum, the horse had EXTREMELY overlong upper 6’s.  These are the first teeth you see in each row of upper cheek teeth.  They were easily 1.5 to 2 inches taller than any of the other teeth.  Because of these extremely tall “battering rams”, the teeth below them were worn away almost entirely.  All that was left was a flat piece of tooth at the level of the gums.  Don’t tell me this horse did not have a headache!  Years of constant pounding of the large upper tooth against the smaller lower one eventually caused this serious imbalance. This horse was dropping food because he could not effectively grind and chew his food. Eventually this caused his weight loss and general poor health.

Discussion -

This horse had certainly been “floated” in the past, as none of the edges of his teeth were sharp, per se, but unfortunately for the horse and the unknowing owner, only a fraction of the whole job had been done.  What all this means, is that the sharp edges of this horse’s upper rows of teeth had been removed by a hand rasp (float), but no attention was paid to the occlusion of the teeth, or the way in which the long rows of teeth came together.  Since he is in his mid-20’s, the chances of the lower teeth erupting back in to any great extent are slim.  The aim of his corrective dentistry was to reduce the upper “fangs” to stop them from constantly wearing down the teeth below them, and to allow the horse to move his jaw in a normal side to side, and front to back , motion when he eats and is ridden.  This should keep him comfortable and able to eat more efficiently during his golden years.   The moral of the story, (once again!!!!) is that to do a good job in a horse’s mouth, one must look in there with a flashlight and a speculum to determine what is actually going on!  Your own human dentist doesn’t just stick an instrument  blindly into your mouth without first checking out the situation, does he?  I see this over and over where either the previous floater did not see the enormous tooth, or alternately, he saw it and chose to just leave it because a) he didn’t know it needed to be reduced, b) he was tired and couldn’t finish the job, or c) didn’t have the instrumentation to reduce it, etc. etc. etc..

All of these would be just fine IF he had mentioned this to the owner and referred the case to someone who could finish the job. Just another case of someone “removing the tip off of Mount Everest, but leaving the rest of the huge mountain”! If only we had been able to work on this horse 10 years ago, this problem could have been headed off at the pass and completely corrected! He could have a full set of teeth today.

Overlong 1/06 and 2/06 premolars

They look like fangs!

Normal height of upper row of molars

The teeth below the big ones are pushed to the gum line.

The tongue and cheek tissues are damaged from these large teeth.

2/06 reduced to a more appropriate height

1/06 still overly long

1/06 reduced to more appropriate height

Bilateral “fang” reduction nearly complete!

TUMOR